Tea Tree

Botanical binomial: Melaleuca alterifolia

Family: Myrtaceae

Other names: Melaleuca

Part of plant used in production: Leaves and stem

Methods of production: Steam distillation

Description: A tall shrub or small tree with hairless leaves that are prominent in oil glands. It bears fluffy, white flowers during blooming season.
Characteristics: Tea tree essential oil has a herbaceous, green, leathery aroma.
Properties: Anti-bacterial, anti-microbial, anti-septic, anti-viral, cicatrisant, expectorant, anti-fungal, insecticide, stimulant, and sudorific substance.
Constituents: α-Pinene, β-Pinene, Sabinene, Myrcene, α-Phellandrene, α-Terpinene, Limonene, Cineole, δ-Terpinene, Para-Cymene, Terpinolene, Linalool, Terpinenol, and α-Terpineol.
Uses:

Tea tree's popularity comes from the fact that it is highly antiseptic and anti-inflammatory. It is used in household cleaners, detergents, massage oils, creams, and other skincare products. 

It is also used to relieve muscular pain, aches, and sprains. Tea tree oil improves blood circulation, speeding the healing process and increases the rate of new tissue and cellular growth. The oil is rejuvenating and cleansing, provides clear breathing along with a cooling effect on the skin.

Blends well with: Cinnamon, Clary sage, Clove, Geranium, Lavender, Lemon, Myrrh, Nutmeg, Rosewood, Rosemary and Thyme.
Interesting Facts: The name Tea tree is used in several plants from the family Myrtaceae, which are all native to Australia and New Zealand.
Safety: For topical uses only, dilute before use. Avoid contact with eyes and mouth. Tea tree oil is poisonous when taken internally.
Nutra Pura Australia 505 / 90 George Street, Hornsby 2077, New South Wales